In social justice, there’s this absurd meme (that I’ve been guilty of myself) is that we are the “voice for the voiceless,” but that’s not right. The oppressed are not voiceless – they’re just not being listened to.

Dianna Anderson, of Be the Change, at Rachel Held Evans’ “Ask a Feminist” (via emm-in-sem)

Wooo, I like this. 

(via iamateenagefeminist)

Perfect quote is perfect.

(via cand86)

Gonna print this out and stick it on my mirror. Keep that shit in check.

(via ishkwaakiiwan)

Or that one is “GIVING” a voice to a marginalized person. Which is very problematic as well. Having a voice is different to not being heard.

(via newwavefeminism)

And always remember that our ‘voices’ are not always spoken word, there are many ways to communicate and they should all be respected

(via silversarcasm)

(Source: dandelionbreaks, via importanceofbeingvisible)

Is it political if I tell you that if we burn coal, you’re going to warm the atmosphere? Or is that a statement of fact that you’ve made political? It’s a scientific statement. The fact that there are elements of society that have made it political, that’s a whole other thing.

Neil deGrasse Tyson (via socio-logic)

(Source: alwaysmoneyinthebnanastand, via sagansense)

library-lessons:

-via The Sexy Librarian
library-lessons:

-via The Sexy Librarian

library-lessons:

-via The Sexy Librarian

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

darkprincesspeach:

Aww lil baby ninja turtle!
darkprincesspeach:

Aww lil baby ninja turtle!

darkprincesspeach:

Aww lil baby ninja turtle!

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

the-library-lady:

silencewhippersnapper:

brownsharpie:

I love the librarians where I work.

I need to start doing this.

I have a lot of missed connections…
the-library-lady:

silencewhippersnapper:

brownsharpie:

I love the librarians where I work.

I need to start doing this.

I have a lot of missed connections…

the-library-lady:

silencewhippersnapper:

brownsharpie:

I love the librarians where I work.

I need to start doing this.

I have a lot of missed connections…

(via marioncolibraries)

thecraftychemist:

Laplace rail

2 magnets disk on a axle4.5 Volts 2Amp2 aluminum bands on plastic

The Laplace rail is a good demonstration of the ‘right hand curl rule’

Using a hand as a guide If we have a current moving in the direction of the thumb, the magnetic field will be oriented in the direction of the curled fingers
When the current is applied the only way for the circuit to be completed is through the axle. Given the red terminal is positive the current is moving from left to right through the axle generating a circular magnetic field that is oriented towards the viewer.
The magnets on each end of the axle are now repelled by the field generated by the current and force the axle to move. If you were to switch the terminals the axle would move towards the viewer - this is demonstrated in the later half of the video which can be found here.

thecraftychemist:

Laplace rail

2 magnets disk on a axle
4.5 Volts 2Amp
2 aluminum bands on plastic

The Laplace rail is a good demonstration of the ‘right hand curl rule

Using a hand as a guide If we have a current moving in the direction of the thumb, the magnetic field will be oriented in the direction of the curled fingers

When the current is applied the only way for the circuit to be completed is through the axle. Given the red terminal is positive the current is moving from left to right through the axle generating a circular magnetic field that is oriented towards the viewer.

The magnets on each end of the axle are now repelled by the field generated by the current and force the axle to move. If you were to switch the terminals the axle would move towards the viewer - this is demonstrated in the later half of the video which can be found here.

(via mindblowingscience)

5 Photos

catagator:

Continuing to talk about the books on this year’s Outstanding Books for the College Bound list (OBCB), here’s a roundup of all the titles that included a graphic component, either because they were graphic novels or were hybrid titles with graphic elements. When I pulled these together, I loved seeing how diverse this cross-section of titles was, too.

Check them all out here

If you’re curious about other titles on the OBCB list, I’ve been talking about titles that share common themes over the last few months. You can check them out here: 

Music and Musicality

Religion and Spirituality

Girls Across Borders

Football and Football Culture

Bryce Don't Play: "K-5 Programming": Differentiating Instruction in the Library

brycedontplay:

I wrote about teachering in library programming to reach 5 year olds and 10 year olds at the same time.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

When a library is open, no matter its size or shape, democracy is open, too.

Bill Moyers in the foreword to this beautiful photographic love letter to libraries (via explore-blog)

(via washingtonpost)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last of the Seminole Code Talkers
Edmond Harjo was not trained as a Marine code talker. He was in southern France in 1944, serving in the 195th Field Artillery Batallion, when he discovered another soldier who spoke the Creek dialect. The two were conversing in their native tongue when an officer wandered by, heard the two men, and recruited them into communications. /p>
Famously, the U.S. Marine Corps recruited more than 300 members of the Navajo tribe to serve as the first code talkers of World War II. The Navajo language was considered especially effective as a code source since it had no alphabet and few people outside the tribe could speak the language. 
As the war progressed, other Native Americans were recruited to disguise communications in a way that was nearly impossible for the enemy to decode. And since it was a simple modification of a native language, the soldiers made few mistakes in transmitting codes. Neither the Germans nor the Japanese ever broke the codes used by Mr. Harjo or the Native Americans from 33 other tribes across the United States.
Recognition for Mr. Harjo and his peers was slow in coming. To begin, the code talker program remained classified until 1968. Even then it was take another 3 decades for the Navajo code talkers to earn recognition for their work, when the 29 original members were each given a Congressional Gold Medal in 2000. Eight years later, gold medals were struck for some of the other tribes that assisted in the war effort.
In November 2013 after additional research and congressional pressure, 33 more tribes were given Congressional Gold Medals to honor the service of their code talkers. Mr. Harjo, the only surviving code talker to attend the ceremony, received a silver replica of the medal. (He had also received a Silver Star during the war for his work as a code talker.)
Edmond Harjo, a member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, died on March 31, 2014 at the age of 96.
Sources: Daily Mail, NativeTimes.com, Huffington Post, and Wikipedia
(Image of Edmond Harjo, November 20, 2013, at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony. The image is copyright Chip Somodevilla/Getty and courtesy of USA Today.)
Obit of the Day has featured several Navajo code talkers over the years:
Wilfred Billey
Keith Little
Frank Chee Milleto
Joe Morris, Sr.
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last of the Seminole Code Talkers
Edmond Harjo was not trained as a Marine code talker. He was in southern France in 1944, serving in the 195th Field Artillery Batallion, when he discovered another soldier who spoke the Creek dialect. The two were conversing in their native tongue when an officer wandered by, heard the two men, and recruited them into communications. /p>
Famously, the U.S. Marine Corps recruited more than 300 members of the Navajo tribe to serve as the first code talkers of World War II. The Navajo language was considered especially effective as a code source since it had no alphabet and few people outside the tribe could speak the language. 
As the war progressed, other Native Americans were recruited to disguise communications in a way that was nearly impossible for the enemy to decode. And since it was a simple modification of a native language, the soldiers made few mistakes in transmitting codes. Neither the Germans nor the Japanese ever broke the codes used by Mr. Harjo or the Native Americans from 33 other tribes across the United States.
Recognition for Mr. Harjo and his peers was slow in coming. To begin, the code talker program remained classified until 1968. Even then it was take another 3 decades for the Navajo code talkers to earn recognition for their work, when the 29 original members were each given a Congressional Gold Medal in 2000. Eight years later, gold medals were struck for some of the other tribes that assisted in the war effort.
In November 2013 after additional research and congressional pressure, 33 more tribes were given Congressional Gold Medals to honor the service of their code talkers. Mr. Harjo, the only surviving code talker to attend the ceremony, received a silver replica of the medal. (He had also received a Silver Star during the war for his work as a code talker.)
Edmond Harjo, a member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, died on March 31, 2014 at the age of 96.
Sources: Daily Mail, NativeTimes.com, Huffington Post, and Wikipedia
(Image of Edmond Harjo, November 20, 2013, at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony. The image is copyright Chip Somodevilla/Getty and courtesy of USA Today.)
Obit of the Day has featured several Navajo code talkers over the years:
Wilfred Billey
Keith Little
Frank Chee Milleto
Joe Morris, Sr.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last of the Seminole Code Talkers

Edmond Harjo was not trained as a Marine code talker. He was in southern France in 1944, serving in the 195th Field Artillery Batallion, when he discovered another soldier who spoke the Creek dialect. The two were conversing in their native tongue when an officer wandered by, heard the two men, and recruited them into communications. /p>

Famously, the U.S. Marine Corps recruited more than 300 members of the Navajo tribe to serve as the first code talkers of World War II. The Navajo language was considered especially effective as a code source since it had no alphabet and few people outside the tribe could speak the language. 

As the war progressed, other Native Americans were recruited to disguise communications in a way that was nearly impossible for the enemy to decode. And since it was a simple modification of a native language, the soldiers made few mistakes in transmitting codes. Neither the Germans nor the Japanese ever broke the codes used by Mr. Harjo or the Native Americans from 33 other tribes across the United States.

Recognition for Mr. Harjo and his peers was slow in coming. To begin, the code talker program remained classified until 1968. Even then it was take another 3 decades for the Navajo code talkers to earn recognition for their work, when the 29 original members were each given a Congressional Gold Medal in 2000. Eight years later, gold medals were struck for some of the other tribes that assisted in the war effort.

In November 2013 after additional research and congressional pressure, 33 more tribes were given Congressional Gold Medals to honor the service of their code talkers. Mr. Harjo, the only surviving code talker to attend the ceremony, received a silver replica of the medal. (He had also received a Silver Star during the war for his work as a code talker.)

Edmond Harjo, a member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, died on March 31, 2014 at the age of 96.

Sources: Daily Mail, NativeTimes.com, Huffington Post, and Wikipedia

(Image of Edmond Harjo, November 20, 2013, at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony. The image is copyright Chip Somodevilla/Getty and courtesy of USA Today.)

Obit of the Day has featured several Navajo code talkers over the years:

Wilfred Billey

Keith Little

Frank Chee Milleto

Joe Morris, Sr.

8 Photos
thepinakes:

I’m a librarian married to an accountant. This could be our memoir.
Source: Professional Literature for Librarians (pulp covers, library topics).

thepinakes:

I’m a librarian married to an accountant. This could be our memoir.

Source: Professional Literature for Librarians (pulp covers, library topics).

(via alsklingexpat)

Nine in ten 18-to-29-year-olds watch online videos, and almost half, 48%, watch online news videos. That is equal to the 49% of 30-to-49-year-olds who watch online news video and outpaces the 27% of 50-to-64-year-olds and 11% of those 65 and older who do the same.

Online video and news — get the data here.  (via pewresearch)

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