Welcome to one of many librarian blogs on the Internet! My name is Melina and I will be evaluating youth literature and digital media. Entries will factor in Quantitative reading levels and Content Standards. Entries consider Common Core Standards, California Content Standards, AASL, and Model School Standards. Quantitative Reading Levels are determined using Read- Ability Score.com (text) and the Readability Test Tool (Website). Enjoy!!

This blog may also feature some humour, people first advocacy, and plant based nutrition tidbits. Librarians are eclectic types. Party on.

Thanks for stopping by =)


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I’M A TEEN LIBRARIAN, AND KIDS TODAY NEED WELL-FUNDED LIBRARIES MORE THAN EVER IF THEY’RE GOING TO SUCCEED


I never wanted to teach. As a starry-eyed 20-year-old pursuing by BA in English, my family would ask, “What are you going to do with that? Teach?” and I would make the same face you make when you don’t get your dog outside fast enough in the middle of the night. I felt the same about children as I did about surprise dog crap. Teach? Me? No way.
 

So, after graduation, when my plan to write the Great American novel didn’t pan out, I did what any slightly emo, Southern gothic literary nerd would do, and went to library school. I wasn’t going to teach, I was going to read! And they would pay me to do it! Now, as a part-time teen librarian in a large-ish diverse suburb in north Texas, I look back on that 24-year-old library student and alternatively want to laugh and throw up. Read for a living? Clueless.

I’M A TEEN LIBRARIAN, AND KIDS TODAY NEED WELL-FUNDED LIBRARIES MORE THAN EVER IF THEY’RE GOING TO SUCCEED


I never wanted to teach. As a starry-eyed 20-year-old pursuing by BA in English, my family would ask, “What are you going to do with that? Teach?” and I would make the same face you make when you don’t get your dog outside fast enough in the middle of the night. I felt the same about children as I did about surprise dog crap. Teach? Me? No way.
 

So, after graduation, when my plan to write the Great American novel didn’t pan out, I did what any slightly emo, Southern gothic literary nerd would do, and went to library school. I wasn’t going to teach, I was going to read! And they would pay me to do it! Now, as a part-time teen librarian in a large-ish diverse suburb in north Texas, I look back on that 24-year-old library student and alternatively want to laugh and throw up. Read for a living? Clueless.

I’M A TEEN LIBRARIAN, AND KIDS TODAY NEED WELL-FUNDED LIBRARIES MORE THAN EVER IF THEY’RE GOING TO SUCCEED


I never wanted to teach. As a starry-eyed 20-year-old pursuing by BA in English, my family would ask, “What are you going to do with that? Teach?” and I would make the same face you make when you don’t get your dog outside fast enough in the middle of the night. I felt the same about children as I did about surprise dog crap. Teach? Me? No way.
 

So, after graduation, when my plan to write the Great American novel didn’t pan out, I did what any slightly emo, Southern gothic literary nerd would do, and went to library school. I wasn’t going to teach, I was going to read! And they would pay me to do it! Now, as a part-time teen librarian in a large-ish diverse suburb in north Texas, I look back on that 24-year-old library student and alternatively want to laugh and throw up. Read for a living? Clueless.
I never wanted to teach. As a starry-eyed 20-year-old pursuing by BA in English, my family would ask, “What are you going to do with that? Teach?” and I would make the same face you make when you don’t get your dog outside fast enough in the middle of the night. I felt the same about children as I did about surprise dog crap. Teach? Me? No way.
 
So, after graduation, when my plan to write the Great American novel didn’t pan out, I did what any slightly emo, Southern gothic literary nerd would do, and went to library school. I wasn’t going to teach, I was going to read! And they would pay me to do it! Now, as a part-time teen librarian in a large-ish diverse suburb in north Texas, I look back on that 24-year-old library student and alternatively want to laugh and throw up. Read for a living? Clueless.
While toy libraries target younger children, libraries that offer video games draw teens. A librarian at the Houston Public Library tells NPR that offering game consoles and iPads “results in a 15% to 20% increase in the circulation of books.” The games themselves also seem to help struggling readers, with some reading text in video game format “that was up to eight grades above their reading level,” says Constance Steinkuehler, an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin.
Having gaming available at libraries has other advantages as well. It gives lower-income youth the chance to play games they may not be able to afford; offers teenagers a safe place; and helps teens understand that the library is a place where they can belong.

sagansense:

universalequalityisinevitable:

From this episode of DNews with Laci Green.

I’ve been saying this for quite a long time.

Unforeseen (albeit accurately predicted) disruptive technologies fueled by an unwavering exponential growth curve (Moore’s Law) will lead to technological unemployment amidst a society shackled to the traditional capitalistic platform. We’re here through the processes of evolution by natural selection. And to borrow words from Peter Diamandis, we’re currently in the midst of a transition into the future via evolution by intelligent direction.

Browse my archive of Peter Diamandis posts for more on this…